Understanding Close Contact. Let's talk about close contact —people who were close enough to someone who tested positive for COVID-19, for  long enough, that  we think they  could get sick. Read our blog post:  bit.ly/35t8NU7

En español


When we talk about who needs to quarantine and who needs to get tested, we talk about close contact—people who were close enough to someone who tested positive for COVID-19 for long enough that we think they could get sick.When folks ask us for advice if they should get tested, we often ask them if they have had close contact. If they say yes, we say, “Can you tell me more about that?” And what they often share is not what we consider close contact. Which is understandable—close contact is a complicated topic and this is a scary virus! Let’s take a look at how we define close contact and some common examples.


Defining Close Contact

Just because you were near someone who later tested positive for COVID-19 doesn’t mean you were necessarily a close contact. When we say close contact, we mean one of these things happened:

  • You were within 6 feet of a person who tested positive for more than 15 minutes total in a day (this time does not need to be consecutive. Three, 5-minute periods over the course of a day is still close contact).
  • You had any physical contact with a person who has tested positive.
  • You had direct contact with the respiratory secretions of a person who has tested positive (i.e., from coughing, sneezing, contact with a dirty tissue, shared drinking glass, food, or other personal items).
  • You live with or stayed overnight for at least one night in a household with the person who tested positive.

If you are a close contact, you will need to get tested and quarantine for 14 days. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Keep in mind the definition for close contact could change at any time. With this novel virus there is new and emerging research every day that gives us more insights into how it’s spread.


Was That Close Contact?

Let’s look at a few examples to see what is and isn’t close contact:

Scenario 1: The masked barbecue

  • You and your neighbor grill together in your backyard. You’re within six feet but are both wearing a mask. The next day he calls and tells you he tested positive for COVID-19.
  • Was this close contact: Yes. Even if you’re wearing a mask or outside, if you’re within six feet for 15 or more minutes, you are considered a close contact. You should quarantine and get tested. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 2: The friend of a friend

  • Your teenager went over to a friend’s house for dinner. Earlier that morning, the friend had volleyball practice. Later in the week, the friend finds out that someone on the team tested positive and texts your teenager the news.
  • Was this close contact: No. Your teenager did not have close contact with someone who tested positive.

Scenario 3: The rule followers

  • You work at a construction site. Everyone always wears a mask and stays at least six feet from each other. One of your co-workers tested positive, but you’ve never been within six feet of her.
  • Was this close contact? No. And great job taking precautions to keep everyone safe!

Scenario 4: The unknown schoolmate

  • You get a note from your child’s school that someone in their building tested positive. The child who tested positive is not in your child’s classroom.
  • Was this close contact: No.

Scenario 5: The repeat chit chatter

  • You have a co-worker who pops into your cubicle a few times a day to chit chat. On Monday, you have a few conversations, none longer than a few minutes. Later that week, he gets a positive COVID test result.
  • Was this close contact: Maybe. It depends how long you were together. The 15-minute limit is cumulative but does not have to be consecutive. This means if you have 3, 5-minute conversations within a day, within six feet of each other, you had 15 minutes of close contact. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 6: The outsiders

  • You and your pals meet for an outside happy hour. Everyone is maskless but are about eight feet apart for a couple hours. A few days later, a friend who attended tells the group they tested positive.
  • Was this close contact: No. You must be within six feet of someone for at least 15 minutes for this to be considered close contact.

Scenario 7: The hugger

  • A friend stops by for a quick chat. You both are outside, wearing masks, and about ten feet apart. Before she leaves, she gives you a quick hug. A few days later, she texts you that she tested positive.
  • Was this close contact:  Yes. While you didn’t come within six feet for 15 minutes, you did have physical contact. Physical contact of any kind means you’re a close contact. You should quarantine and get tested. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 8: The parent/child conundrum

  • Your toddler attends daycare. One of the parents of a child in his class tests positive. The parent never had contact with your child, but their child did.
  • Was this close contact? No. You child was not within six feet of someone with COVID-19 for at least 15 minutes.

Scenario 9: The kitchen co-workers

  • Your partner works in a hospital cafeteria. She wears a mask but is within six feet of others nearly the entire day. One of her co-workers—whom she has been within six feet of for at least 15 minutes—tests positive.
  • Was this close contact: Yes, for your partner. Your partner should quarantine and get tested. She should be in a room in your home away from all people and pets for at least 14 days. She must continue to quarantine, even if she has a negative result. You and everyone who lives with you should monitor themselves for symptoms. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 10: The super spreader

  • You attend an indoor wedding with 75 guests. You wear a mask for some of the time, but not the whole time. You try to stay six feet from others, but you definitely got within six feet of some people for 15 or more minutes. A couple days after the wedding, you hear that someone at the wedding tested positive but you don’t know who.
  • Was this close contact: Maybe. Since you don’t know who it is—and in a gathering of that size, it’s very likely more than one person had COVID-19—we can’t be certain you had close contact. In this situation, you should err on the side of caution. Get tested and quarantine for 14 days. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 11: The holiday

  • Your mother in law decides to host Thanksgiving this year. You’re wary about going but agree to attend as long as there are some precautions: you insist on being a few feet apart, cracking open a few windows to increase ventilation, and keeping the gathering to just the 10 people in your family. Everyone passes food around the table and fills their plates. On Saturday your father in law develops a cough and gets tested. On Monday, you hear he has tested positive.
  • Was this close contact: Yes. Reducing risk by increasing ventilation and keeping groups small is important, but it isn’t a foolproof way to avoid getting sick. While not everyone at the table might have been within six feet of your father in law, everyone at the dinner table should get tested and quarantine for 14 days because they all handled food items that he also touched. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 12: The ladies who lunch

  • You and a co-worker grab a bite at a nearby café. You sit inside and wear your masks, except when you’re eating. She feels a little off that afternoon and gets tested the next morning. A few days later she tells you she’s tested positive.
  • Was this close contact: Yes. You were within six feet for 15 or more minutes. Get tested and quarantine for 14 days. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Scenario 13: The close crop

  • You were a close contact to a co-worker and your supervisor has instructed you to quarantine for 14 days. On day three you get tested. On day five, you hear back that your test was negative. You had an appointment to get a haircut on your calendar for weeks and decide not to skip it. On day seven, you go to get your hair cut. You and your stylist wear a mask. On day eight, you’re feeling a little under the weather and go get another test. On day 10 you learn it was positive.
  • Was this close contact: Yes. Your stylist is now a close contact to you because you were within six feet for more than 15 minutes. This is an important reminder that you must quarantine at least 14 days after your last contact with your co-worker. Even if you initially test negative, even if you have no symptoms, you can still be spreading the virus. See our blog post on isolation and quarantine and our “What to do if you were sick or possibly exposed” webpage for more information.

Don’t Be a Close Contact…Take Precautions!

To avoid becoming a close contact, do not gather, wear a mask, and stay at least six feet from people you don’t live with at all times. Find more recommendations for reducing your risk on our website.


Entendiendo el Contacto CercanoEntendiendo el contacto cercano, Hablemos del contacto cercano – personas han estado cerca de alguien que dio positivo en la prueba de covid-19, durante el tiempo  suficiente, como  para pensar que  podrían  enfermarse.Lee nuestro blog: bit.ly/3f9d9TM

Cuando hablamos sobre quién debe ponerse en cuarentena y quién debe hacerse la prueba, hablamos de contacto cercano: personas que han estado cerca de alguien que dio positivo en la prueba de COVID-19, durante el tiempo suficiente, como para pensar que podrían enfermarse.

Cuando las personas nos piden consejo sobre si deben hacerse la prueba, a menudo les preguntamos si han tenido un contacto cercano. Si dicen que sí, les preguntamos: "¿Puedes contarme más sobre eso?" Y lo que a menudo comparten no es lo que consideramos contacto cercano. Lo cual es comprensible: ¡el contacto cercano es un tema complicado y este es un virus aterrador! Echemos un vistazo a cómo definimos el contacto cercano y algunos ejemplos comunes.


Definición de Contacto Cercano

Solo porque estuvieras cerca de alguien que luego dio positivo por COVID-19 no significa que necesariamente fueras un contacto cercano. Cuando hablamos de contacto cercano, nos referimos a que sucedió una de estas cosas:

  • Estuviste a 6 pies de una persona que dio positivo por más de 15 minutos en total en un día (este tiempo no necesita ser consecutivo. Tres períodos de 5 minutos en el transcurso de un día siguen siendo un contacto cercano).
  • Tuviste algún tipo de contacto físico con una persona que dio positivo en la prueba.
  • Tuviste contacto directo con secreciones respiratorias de una persona que dio positive en la prueba (por ejemplo: tos, estornudos, contacto con un pañuelo sucio, compartir vasos, comidas u otros artículos personales).
  • Vives o pasaste al menos una noche en una casa con la persona que dio positivo en la prueba.

Si eres un contacto cercano, debes hacerte la prueba y ponerte en cuarentena por 14 días. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Ten en cuenta que la definición de contacto cercano podría cambiar en cualquier momento. Con este nuevo virus, cada día salen nuevas investigaciones que nos brindan más información sobre cómo se propaga.


¿Fue Eso Contacto Cercano?

Veamos algunos ejemplos para entender qué es y qué no es contacto cercano:

Escenario 1: La barbacoa enmascarada

  • Tú y tu vecino asan juntos en tu patio trasero. Estás a menos de 6 pies, pero ambos llevan una máscara. Al día siguiente, te llama y te dice que dio positivo por COVID-19.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Si. Incluso si usas una máscara o estás afuera, si estás dentro de los seis pies durante 15 minutos o más, se considera un contacto cercano. Deberías ponerte en cuarentena y hacerte la prueba. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 2: El amigo de un amigo

  • Tu hijo adolescente fue a cenar a casa de un amigo. Esa misma mañana, el amigo practicó voleibol. Más adelante en la semana, el amigo descubre que alguien del equipo dio positivo y le envía un mensaje de texto a tu hijo con la noticia.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: No. Tu hijo no tuvo contacto cercano con alguien que dio positivo en la prueba.

Escenario 3: Siguiendo las reglas

  • Trabajas en un lugar de construcción. Todos siempre usan máscaras y se mantienen al menos a 6 pies de distancia. Una de tus compañeras dio positivo en la prueba, pero nunca has estado a menos de seis pies de distancia de ella.  
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: No. ¡Y buen trabajo tomando precauciones para mantener a todos a salvo!

Escenario 4: El compañero de escuela desconocido

  • Recibes una nota de la escuela de tu hijo(a) diciendo que alguien en el edificio dio positivo en la prueba. El niño que dio positivo no está en el salón de clases de tu hijo(a).
  • Fue esto contacto cercano:  No.

Escenario 5: La charla repetida

  • Tienes un compañero de trabajo que entra a tu cubículo varias veces al día para charlar. El lunes, tienes algunas conversaciones, ninguna de más de unos minutos. Más tarde esa semana, tu compañero obtiene un resultado positivo en la prueba COVID.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Tal vez. Depende de cuánto tiempo estuvieron juntos. El límite de 15 minutos es acumulativo, pero no tiene que ser consecutivo. Esto significa que, si tienen conversaciones de 3, 5 minutos en un día con una distancia de seis pies entre sí, tuvo 15 minutos de contacto cercano. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 6: Al aire libre

  • Tú y tus amigos se encuentran para una hora feliz “happy hour” al aire libre. Nadie tiene máscara, pero están a unos ocho pies de distancia durante un par de horas. Unos días después, un amigo que asistió al evento le dice al grupo que dio positivo.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: No. Debes de estar a menos de seis pies de distancia de alguien durante al menos 15 minutes para ser considerado contacto cercano.

Escenario 7: Le gustan los abrazos

  • Un amigo pasa a charlar rápidamente. Ambos están afuera, con máscaras y a unos diez pies de distancia. Antes de irse, te da un abrazo rápido. Unos días después, te envía un mensaje de texto diciendo que dio positivo.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Si.  Mientras mantuvieron los seis pies de distancia, sí tuvo contacto físico. El contacto físico de cualquier tipo significa que eres un contacto cercano. Deberías ponerte en cuarentena y hacerte la prueba. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 8: El acertijo del padre e hijo

  • Tu niño(a) asiste a la guardería. Uno de los padres de un niño de su clase da positivo. El padre nunca tuvo contacto con tu hijo(a), pero su hijo sí.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: No. Tu hijo(a) no estuvo a menos de seis pies de distancia de alguien con COVID-19 durante al menos 15 minutos.

Escenario 9: Compañeros en la cocina

  • Tu pareja trabaja en la cafetería de un hospital. Lleva una máscara, pero está alrededor de seis pies de distancia de otras personas casi todo el día. Uno de sus compañeros de trabajo, de quien ha estado a menos de seis pies de distancia durante al menos 15 minutos, da positivo.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Sí, para tu pareja. Tu pareja debe ponerse en cuarentena y hacerse la prueba. Ella debe estar en una habitación de su casa lejos de todas las personas y mascotas durante al menos 14 días. Debe continuar en cuarentena, incluso si tiene un resultado negativo. Tú y todas las personas que viven con ustedes deben mantener vigilancia para detectar síntomas. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 10: Súper esparcidor

  • Asistes a una boda interior con 75 invitados. Usas una máscara durante parte del tiempo, pero no todo el tiempo. Intentas permanecer a seis pies de distancia de los demás, pero definitivamente te acercaste a menos de seis pies de algunas personas durante 15 minutos o más. Un par de días después de la boda, escuchas que alguien en la boda dio positivo, pero no sabes quién.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Tal vez. Como no sabes quién es, y en una reunión de ese tamaño, es muy probable que más de una persona tuviera COVID-19, no podemos estar seguros de que hayas tenido un contacto cercano. En esta situación, debes mantener la precaución. Hazte la prueba y ponte en cuarentena durante 14 días. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 11: Las festividades

  • Tu suegra decide organizar el Día de Acción de Gracias este año. Estás indeciso sobre ir, pero aceptas asistir siempre que haya algunas precauciones: insistes en estar a unos pocos pies de distancia, abrir algunas ventanas para aumentar la ventilación y mantener la reunión solo para las 10 personas de tu familia. Todos pasan la comida por la mesa y se sirven. El sábado a tu suegro le da tos y se hace la prueba. El lunes, escuchas que dio positivo.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Si. Es importante reducir el riesgo aumentando la ventilación y manteniendo grupos pequeños, pero no es una forma firme de evitar enfermarse. Si bien no todos los que estaban en la mesa podrían haber estado a menos de seis pies de tu suegro, todos los que estaban a la mesa deben hacerse la prueba y ponerse en cuarentena durante 14 días porque todos manipularon alimentos que él también tocó. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 12: Almorzando juntas

  • Tú y una compañera de trabajo se juntan a comer en un café cercano. Se sientan adentro y usan sus máscaras, excepto cuando están comiendo. Ella se siente un poco mal esa tarde y se hace la prueba a la mañana siguiente. Unos días después, ella te dice que dio positivo en la prueba.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Si. Estuvieron a menos de seis pies de distancia por más de 15 minutos Hazte la prueba y ponte en cuarentena por 14 días. Consulta la publicación de nuestro blog sobre aislamiento y cuarentena y nuestra página de Qué hacer si está enfermo o posiblemente expuesto para más información.

Escenario 13: La cosecha cercana

  • Fuiste un contacto cercano con un compañero de trabajo y tu supervisor te ha indicado que te pongas en cuarentena durante 14 días. El día 3 te haces la prueba. El día 5, te enteras de que tu prueba fue negativa. Decides ir a cortarte el pelo ya que tenías esta cita en tu calendario durante semanas. El día 7, vas a cortarte el pelo. Tú y tu estilista usan una máscara. El día 8, te sientes un poco mal y te haces otra prueba. El día 10 te dan el resultado y es positivo.
  • Fue esto contacto cercano: Si. Tu estilista ahora es un contacto cercano para ti porque estuviste a menos de seis pies de distancia durante más de 15 minutos. Este es un recordatorio importante de que debes ponerte en cuarentena al menos 14 días después de tu último contacto con tu compañero de trabajo. Incluso si la prueba inicial es negativa, incluso si no tienes síntomas, aún puedes estar propagando el virus.

¡No Sea un Contacto Cercano…Tome Precauciones!

Una forma segura de evitar convertirte en un contacto cercano es usar una máscara y mantenerte al menos a seis pies de distancia de las personas con las que no vives en todo momento. Encuentra más recomendaciones para reducir tu riesgo en nuestra página web.
 

This content is free for use with credit to the City of Madison - Public Health Madison & Dane County and a link back to the original post.